Crichton elevated to high court

Elevated to High Court (From The Times, December 16th, 2014 By: John Andrew Prime)

In just under an hour and with equal doses of piety, humor, humility and zeal, Scott Crichton doffed the robes of a Caddo District Court judge and donned those of the Louisiana Supreme Court.

Elected without opposition in the fall elections, he was welcomed by his peers on the state’s loftiest bench and given a farewell by his fellow Caddo District Court brethren.

Hundreds thronged Caddo District Court’s second floor. Professionals from all walks of life — from fellow judges and elected officials including district attorneys and their staffs from the 11 parishes Crichton now serves, to private attorneys, doctors and accountants — filled not only the large and sumptuous courtroom, but also several surrounding courtrooms. Their galleries, jury boxes and even the dockets for the accused, were full.

And why not?

According to at least one speaker, it was only the third time in the Louisiana Supreme Court’s 201-year history that it has sat in Shreveport.

Induction Ceremony Invitation

Induction Ceremony Invitation

Crichton, 60, was sworn in by Chief Justice Bernette Joshua Johnson, with the assistance of his wife of three decades, Susie. His robing, just moments later, was done by his sons Stuart and Samuel, who followed their father into the practice of law.

“I’ve never done this with help,” he quipped as his sons helped him into the raiments with an audible zipping noise.

But those were the formalities.

The depth of the moment was conveyed by Crichton in his remarks at the close of the ceremony, and through the humor and anecdotes of four friends he asked to speak before his life transformed from one affecting Caddo Parish to one affecting the entire state.

The most informal and off-the-cuff remarks were by Caddo Sheriff Steve Prator who, of course, told a lawyer joke.

Prator shared the story of a fine hunting dog named “Lawyer” that impressed everyone with the ability to smoke out game. But the next time people saw the hound, he just sat in the blind and barked.

“What happened?” someone asked.

“One of the hunters last year called him ‘Judge,’” Prator deadpanned as more than one courtroom erupted into laughter that was not gavelled down. “We hope you remember the lawyers you’ve worked with as you sit in the blind and bark.”

Judge James Stewart of the Second Circuit Court of Appeal, whose early career paralleled that of Crichton as they served together, first as assistant district attorneys and then as judges at Caddo District Court, said during his 45 minutes sitting next to Prator the sheriff had been “trying to egg me on to turn this into a roast. But I decided I’d better stay on script.”

Crichton, Stewart said, “was like a pit bulldog when he locked onto a case, but I knew that before he locked his jaw tight to prosecute he always wanted to make sure justice was being served.”

Late in their work as prosecutors, Stewart served as Crichton’s supervisor.

“I always had comfort that I could turn him loose on the most serious and complicated cases and know that he would take care of it,” Stewart said.

Fellow Caddo District Court Judge Brady O’Callaghan began with humor as well, saying he planned to talk about something no one else would: “His phenomenal mustache grooming. No matter the time of day, rain or shine, it is always impeccable.”

But he cartwheeled immediately into serious talk about Crichton’s “unwavering dedication to the rule of law and the importance of every individual case being taken on its own merits.”

He noted that Crichten never became jaded or used to the daily parade of lawlessness, but still was able to feel outrage, so much in fact that “the word became his catchphrase, once appearing five times in three lines of a transcript.”

And, he noted, Crichton was unflappable, treating the accused with the dignity appropriate to the setting. Once, O’Callaghan recalled, Crichton found himself on an elevator with a criminal defendant.

“The defendant studied Scott carefully, then broke into a smile,” O’Callaghan said. “‘Hey judge, I didn’t recognize you without your cape!’”

Larry Pettiette, president of the Shreveport Bar Association, the first of the four speakers, pointed out three strong suits of Crichton’s that he thought would serve well on the state’s highest court.

He said what a hard worker Crichton was, illustrating with his attention to detail in writing opinions and moving his docket.

“This community, and this First Judicial District Court, are sending you someone who works very hard,” he told the high justices. “He possesses high energy, a prerequisite for your work load. He will do whatever it takes.”

He then recalled a case where Crichton had taken the time to deny a temporary restraining order when an elderly witness it would have affected and likely impoverished could not understand it when harassed by an arrogant attorney.

“We send to you, the Supreme Court of Louisiana, a judge who understands the rule of law and how important it is that people’s rights be protected,” Pettiette said. “He has a judge’s heart and will attempt to do what the law demands regardless of who is involved.”

He closed by noting, as did most of the speakers, Crichton’s ceaseless, untiring presentations to middle school and high school students to forestall criminality on such subjects as “Electronic Crimes: Sexting, Texting and Beyond” and “Don’t Let This Be You.” These give impressionable youngsters a look at what it is really like to be arrested and have to deal with the law.

“We reluctantly give you Judge Scott Crichton,” Pettiette concluded, “A resource we will sorely miss.”

For his part, in final remarks Crichton thanked the District Court he was departing, God and his parents, as well as his wife, for making him the man and the judge that he is today.

He especially thanked his parents, the late Thomas and Mary Crichton, for stressing the importance of education, which he said he took to heart.

“Our parents taught us that with education and hard work, anything was possible,” he said. “And it was that gift of education, including law school, that would make all the difference for a purpose-driven professional life of service in the law. Sadly, my parents would not live long enough to see me elected judge. They both died more than 25 years ago but with this commission and, in accordance with the 5th Commandment, I honor them today. Every day I strive to carry their lessons forward.”

He said in the two years since he felt the call to run for the state office, he’s had a chance to visit the 11 parish his seat serves, and has met with people the law touches every day.

“The law often deals in abstractions and hypothetical situations, but the decisions that judges and justices make about the law have great consequences for the people whose lives are affected,” he said. “I pledge to remember my renewed appreciation for the real and practical consequences of the decisions I help make as I assume this great honor.

“The Crichton family motto is ‘God Send Grace,’ and I have no doubt been blessed with abundant grace,” he said. “And I live by the scripture, ‘For unto whomsoever much is given, of him shall be much required.’ Thus with this grace and blessings, including importantly, this position on the Supreme Court, comes obligation and responsibility to this state with dignity and honor.

“To my colleagues on the Caddo bench, you are among the best and I will miss you. To my new colleagues on the Supreme Court, I’m ready to go to work and face the challenges that lie ahead.”

Louisiana Supreme Court

Louisiana Supreme Court Associate Justice Scott Crichton serves Judicial District 2, which includes Caddo, Bossier, Webster, DeSoto, Natchitoches, Red River, Sabine, Vernon, Allen, Beauregard and Evangeline parishes.

Other judges on the state’s highest bench are Chief Justice Bernette J. Johnson of the Seventh District, and associate justices Greg G. Guidry, First District; Jeannette Theriot Knoll, Third District; Marcus R. Clark, Fourth District; Jefferson D. Hughes III, Fifth District; and John L. Weimer, Sixth District. The Louisiana Supreme Court’s website is at http://www.lasc.org/


Louisiana Sheriffs Endorsement

louisiana-sheriffsLouisiana Sheriffs’ Association
1175 Nicholson Drive, Baton Rouge, LA 70802
Phone: 225.343.8402 • Fax: 225.336.0343: • www..lsa.org

Louisiana Sheriffs endorse Judge Scott Crichton for District 2 Supreme Court Justice

The Louisiana Sheriffs’ and Deputies’ Political Action Committee conducted a press conference on Friday 11, 2014 to announce the official endorsement of Judge Scott Crichton for District 2, in the forthcoming Primary election on November 4, 2014, according to the Louisiana Sheriffs’ Association’s Political Action Committee Chairman, West Baton Rouge Parish Sheriff Mike Cazes.

In issuing the endorsement, Sheriff Cazes said, “Judge Crichton’s record serving for 24 years as judge in Caddo parish, and his history of community service through his creation of relevant public safety education programs are testaments to his character and integrity, and his commitment to the principles of good law enforcement. The Louisiana Sheriffs’ Political Action Committee and the eleven sheriffs of District 2 are proud to endorse Judge Crichton for Supreme Court Justice.”

The Louisiana Sheriffs’ Association is a bipartisan organization, composed of Louisiana’s 64 sheriffs and nearly 14,000 deputy sheriffs, established to represent Louisiana’s chief law enforcement officers across the state. The Association’s purpose is to maintain the constitutional authority of the sheriff as chief law enforcement officer, ensure the delivery of first-rate services, and to sponsor legislation that promotes the administration of criminal justice.

Listen to the Louisiana Sheriffs’ and Deputies’ Political Action Committee press conference.


LABI Endorses Caddo District Judge Scott Crichton for Associate Justice, District 2 Louisiana Supreme Court

The North PAC of the Louisiana Association of Business & Industry (LABI) recently endorsed Caddo District Court Judge Scott Crichton for the soon-to-be vacant seat for Louisiana State Supreme Court Justice.

On Monday. May 5th, 2014, LABI North PAC Chmn. Mike Wolff told “Talk of the Town” radio host Tom Pace the criteria they used to base their endorsement for Crichton.

NorthPacLABI-wLineLABI | NORTHPAC

Brian Landry
NORTHPAC Executive Director
3113 Valley Creek Drive • Baton Rouge, LA 70808 • Phone: 225-928-5388

Judge Scott Crichton Receives Business Group Endorsement For Supreme Court

Baton Rouge, La NORTHPAC, a political action committee of the Louisiana Association of Business and Industry (LABI), has announced its endorsement of Judge Scott Crichton for election to Supreme Court District 2 in northwest Louisiana.

“Residents of northwest Louisiana are very fortunate to have Judge Crichton running to fill the seat vacated by retiring Justice Jeff Victory,” said Brian Landry, executive director of NORTHPAC. “From our interview with Judge Crichton, we believe that his background and impressive courtroom experience warranted an early endorsement.”

“It is clear that the current legal issues facing Louisiana require experience as well as the proper judicial diligence. In NORTHPAC’s view, Judge Crichton has a wealth of both,” said NORTHPAC chairman Mike Wolff.

Landry added, “Electing Judge Crichton to the Louisiana Supreme Court will be a service not only to the residents of district two, but to all the citizens of the state.” LABI’s other three political action committees have also endorsed Judge Crichton in his pursuit of the Supreme Court seat. SouthPAC, EastPAC and WestPAC have individually decided to join NorthPAC in endorsing Crichton. This unanimous endorsement should help him in his efforts to reach out to the business community throughout Louisiana.

 

Listen To This Interview


Under the Gun

Louisiana gun owners enjoy constitutionally-guaranteed rights

PAT CULVERHOUSE
pat@press-hearald.com

Gun owners in Louisiana can be thankful for the state in which they live.

Judge Scott Crichton and Capt. Kenny Sanders talk Bullet Points on the 2nd Amendment with Minden Lions Club

Judge Scott Crichton and Capt. Kenny Sanders talk Bullet Points on the 2nd Amendment with Minden Lions Club

“We have the Louisiana constitutional amendment which says the citizens of Louisiana have a fundamental right to bear arms. We are protected and insulated by the state amendment.” said First Judicial District Court Judge Scott Crichton. “Our state has greater rights and protections than many others.”

Crichton, a Minden native who has been sitting on the bench in Caddo Parish since 1991 and is a candidate for the state Supreme Court in the 11-parish District 2, discussed the Second Amendment and gun responsibilities with members of the Minden Lions Club Thursday.

Joining Crichton in the presentation was Capt. Kenny Sanders of the Caddo Parish Sheriff’s Office. Sanders is director of the regional training academy and is responsible for the instruction of roughly 9,000 law enforcement officers each year.

While Louisiana gun owners enjoy strong constitutionally guaranteed rights where gun ownership is concerned, “…you have to keep your eye on Washington, D.C.” Crichton said.

Crichton cited two cases which went before the U.S. Supreme Court; both involved registration issues where local officials passed laws which made gun ownership almost impossible. In both cases, the Court upheld the Second Amendment and declared the prohibitions unconstitutional.

“But here’s the scary part. The majority ruling in both cases was 5-4,” Crichton said. “In Louisiana, we’re paying attention. We’re concerned about these 5-4 rulings. What if another justice retires and the current administration makes the appointment? What if there is a shift in the majority?”

Crichton said the last gtwo appointments (justices Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan) were made by President Barack Obama and their record is clear. If the president has the opportunity to select another Supreme Court Justice, “…we know what would happen.” the judge said.

Sanders said Louisiana gun owners should be aware that many things they’ve heard about laws in the state need clarification.

“We’re asked about the need to register firearms,” Sanders said “There is no registration requirement in Louisiana for conventional weapons. By conventional, we mean that when you pull the trigger one time, one round is fired. If you have a weapon that fires multiple rounds when the trigger is engaged one time, that weapon must be registered.”

Louisiana gun laws are also unique in another way, Sanders said.

In Louisiana, your car is considered an extension of your home. You can doi the same thing with a gun in your car that you can in your home,” he said. “You can keep it in plain view. You do not need a gun permit to hide a gun in your car or your home.”

While Louisiana gun owners may keep a firearm concealed in the vehicle, Sanders had one suggestion which he considers very important.

If you are stopped by an officer for any reason, he or she will ask you if your have a weapon in your vehicle. Please tell the nice officer that you do and where it is,” he said. “We don’t care that you have one, but please tell us where it is and do not reach in that direction. We’re still trying to determine who you are.”

Sanders said law enforcement officers are seeing far too many issues settled with guns where no gun is really necessary.

“Guns are not the best first option for dealing with trouble. There are options other than killing folks especially when the problem is outside the home,” he said. “We are seeing more people getting shot over issues that are not a threat to life… people are getting shot over dogs, deer stands, duck blinds and the like.”

There is one popular misconception among Louisiana residents about shooting someone who may not be inside a home.

“If you’ve told anyone they should drag a person inside the home if they are shot outside the residence, you are wrong.” Sanders said. “If they are trying to make entry into the home but have not made it inside, shoot him and leave him outside. Don’t drag him into the house and damage a good crime scene. It’s perfectly legal to leave a dead guy outside.”

“There is justification for shooting someone,” Crichton said. “if a person fires a weapon in self defense, defense of the home or place of business it is a justifiable use of force… reasonable and necessary. You may stand your ground and meet force with force.”


Judge Scott J. Crichton Selected to Speak at DeSoto Law Day Event

Judge Scott J. Crichton

Judge Scott J. Crichton

Public officials and the general public to join them as they celebrate Annual Law Day at the DeSoto Parish Courthouse, located at 101 Texas Street in Mansfield. Guest speaker for the event will be the Honorable Scott J. Crichton, Judge of the First Judicial District Court in Caddo Parish

Judge Scott J. Crichton was born in 1954, and is a judge of the Louisiana 1st Judicial District Court in Shreveport, a position which he has held since 1991. Crichton was initially elected to the court in 1990 as a Democrat. He is running as a Republican in a bid to succeed the retiring Justice Jeffrey P. Victory for the District 2 seat on the seven member Louisiana Supreme Court. The nonpartisan blanket primary for the position will be conducted on November 4, 2014 in eleven northwest Louisiana parishes.

From 1981 until 1990, Crichton was a Caddo Parish Assistant District Attorney under the DA Paul Carmouche, in which capacity he prosecuted felonies, including capital murder. From 1885 to 1990, he also maintained a civil law practice. On December 8, 1990, he also maintained a civil law practice . On December 8, 1990, Crichton defeated another Democrat, Charles C. Grubb, for the 1st District Court, 11,053 (55.6 percent) to 8,844 (44.5 percent). Crichton was unopposed for the subsequent six-year terms on the district court in 1996, 2002, and 2008

As a district judge, Crichton has handled more than 25,000 criminal and civil cases. He is a former instructor at the Shreveport Police Academy. From 2011 to 2012, he was the president of the Louisiana District Judges Association. He is a former board member of the YMCA and a lifetime member of the National Rifle Association.

Justice Victory had been expected to seek a third ten-year term on the Louisiana Supreme Court, but Victory, who is eight years Crichton’s senior, announced in August 2013 that he will retire from the bench on December 31, 2014. Because Judge Crichton will haver turned sixty by the time of the 2014 election., he can seek only one term on the Supreme Court because Louisiana state law forbids a lawyer aged seventy or above from qualifying for a judicial position.

Judge Crichton is known for his conservative rulings and avoidance of judicial activism. Outside the courtroom, he works with elementary and high school students with his “Don’t Let This Be You” program, which focuses upon such subjects as drinking and driving, sexting, and recently personal defense. Students are encouraged to attend this event to hear Judge Crichton speak.

For additional information regarding the Law Day event, contact Attorney Adrienne D. White, President of the DeSoto Parish Bar Association at 318-872-1111


Louisiana Sheriffs endorse Judge Scott Crichton for District 2 Supreme Court Justice

DSC03614The Louisiana Sheriffs’ and Deputies’ Political Action Committee conducted a press conference on Friday, April 11, 2014 at 11:00 a.m. at the Petroleum Club at 416 Travis Street, #1500, Shreveport, LA 71101 to announce the official endorsement of Judge Scott Crichton for District 2, according to the Louisiana Sheriffs’ Association’s Political Action Committee Chairman, West Baton Rouge Parish Sheriff Mike Cazes.

In issuing the endorsement, Sheriff Cazes said, “Judge Crichton’s record serving for 24 years as judge in Caddo parish, and his history of community service through his creation of relevant public safety education programs are testaments to his character and integrity, and his commitment to the principles of good law enforcement. The Louisiana Sheriffs’ Political Action Committee and the eleven sheriffs of District 2 are proud to endorse Judge Crichton for Supreme Court Justice.”

The Louisiana Sheriffs’ Association is a bipartisan organization, composed of Louisiana’s 64 sheriffs and nearly 14,000 deputy sheriffs, established to represent Louisiana’s chief law enforcement officers across the state. The Association’s purpose is to maintain the constitutional authority of the sheriff as chief law enforcement officer, ensure the delivery of first-rate services, and to sponsor legislation that promotes the administration of criminal justice.


Caddo Sheriff Honors National Crime Victims’ Rights Week April 6-12, 2014

Caddo Sheriff Steve Prator hosted a proclamation ceremony and awareness luncheon in honor of National Crime Victims’ Rights Week, this Monday, April 7th, 2014 at the Caddo Parish Sheriff’s Office Re-Entry Facility located at 1121 Forum Drive.

The event was attended by some 50 members of law enforcement, judicial, and medical professionals, who meet the challenges of crime and victims on a daily basis. A joint proclamation from Sheriff Prator & Mayor Glover was read.

Speakers included: Caddo Parish Sheriff Steve Prator; Moderator, Caddo Deputy, Vickie Johnson; Caddo D.A., Charles Rex Scot; Caddo District Court Judges Scott Crichton & Mike Pittman; U.S. Attorney Stephanie Finley; U.S. Marshal Henry Whitehorn; Steven Jackson from the Shreveport Mayor’s Office & Domestic Violence Survivors and Victims. 

Participants included: the Caddo Sheriff’s Office, Caddo District Attorney’s Office, Caddo Coroner’s Office, Shreveport City Mayor’s Office, Shreveport City Marshal’s Office, Shreveport Police Department, Shreveport Fire Department, Louisiana State Police, Louisiana Department of Justice, U.S. Marshal’s Office, U.S. Attorney’s Office, Greenwood Police Department, Blanchard Police Department, Vivian Police Department, and Oil City Police Department.


Committee to elect Scott J. Crichton to the Louisiana Supreme Court

COMMITTEE TO ELECT SCOTT J. CRICHTON TO
THE LOUISIANA SUPREME COURT

Carolyn Prator, Co-Chairperson
Susan Whitelaw, CPA, Treasurer

FEBRUARY 18, 2014

During the past 24 years of service as judge in Caddo Parish, Scott Crichton has been fully committed to the traditional Rule of Law as enacted by the state legislature with his rulings based on the evidence applied in a courteous, efficient and fair manner for the public safety and public good with a total commitment to honesty and fairness.

The Committee to Elect Scott J. Crichton is humbly inspired by, and thankful for, the support that Judge Crichton’s candidacy has received during the past year.

The Louisiana Supreme Court is our highest court in Louisiana and handles cases on a state-wide basis. As the February 18 Candidate’s Report shows, individuals, families, and businesses across a broad spectrum of Louisiana have contributed to Judge Crichton’s campaign.

This broad spectrum of support reflects the essence of Judge Crichton’s 24 years as a well respected district court judge and also reflects the essence of his campaign for Louisiana Supreme Court. Regardless of level of income, status of litigants or size of the case, Judge Crichton always prepares, listens attentively, works hard, knows the issues and applies the law with honest fairness as the evidence dictates without resorting to judicial activism. In criminal trials, he is also conservative as well as tough on crime while following the dictates of the law.

Reflecting the respect of people and business all across Louisiana for Judge Crichton, the report filed today shows contributions from individuals and families of various income levels and diverse backgrounds, small and large business owners, healthcare professionals and medical doctors, oil and gas related businesses, attorneys from the plaintiff and defense bar, CPAs, educators and community volunteers from all across the State of Louisiana.

We are indeed thankful and proud to serve as officers in the campaign.

Should there be any questions, you may contact the Campaign at (318) 841-8000 or by e-mail at scott@scottforjustice.com.

Carolyn Prator, Co-Chairperson
Susan Whitelaw, CPA, Treasurer


Bullet Points on deploying lethal force

The phone at the Caddo Parish Sheriff’s Office has been ringing nonstop since last week.
Callers are looking for Capt. Kenny Sanders, a firearms trainer and nationally recognized instructor on church and institutional safety. After a 63-year-old Shreveport woman killed an intruder in her home, Sanders said people have questions.
“This week has probably been a world record number of phone calls. It always occurs right after a shooting,” Sanders said. “Suddenly, they get concerned. We wished they’d have been concerned all along, but they’ll call the academy and say, ‘Captain, tell us what our rights are for carrying a gun inside the home.’”
At Tuesday’s meeting of the Shreveport Rotary Club, Sanders and Caddo District Judge Scott Crichton answered those questions with their presentation “Bullet Points on the Second Amendment.”
Crichton spoke on several legal battles, local scenarios and hypothetical situations concerning the deployment and ownership of firearms. He called the state’s constitutional protection of firearms “critical” to liberty and safety.
Below is a list of the six most common misconceptions Sanders has found concerning firearms:

1) I must register my conventional handgun.
“If we just stick to conventional handguns and conventional long guns, there never has been a registration requirement in the great state of Louisiana. That may change, but people frequently call me to say, ‘Where do I go to register my gun?’ That’s only on TV. In Louisiana, there is no registration requirement. You can own practically anything you want to unless you get to a Class 3 weapon. That’s a fully automatic weapon.”

2) It is illegal for me to carry a handgun in my car.
“Current wording of Louisiana law shows that your car is an extension of your home. That means with your gun, you can do anything in your car with your gun that you could do inside your home. Inside your home, if you keep a gun in your bedside table, then could you keep one in the glove box of your car? Well, certainly you can.”
3) If I carry a handgun in my car, the gun must be hidden and unloaded.
“That’s not what you have to do in your house. You can keep the gun loaded in your house. You can keep the gun hidden in your house. You can leave it laying on the kitchen table if you want to. Now if you’re going to ride around with a gun on the dash of your car and a nice Caddo deputy pulls you over, it would be extremely wise that you tell us you’ve got that gun. We have a tendency to get very aggravated when we walk up on a guy with a gun in the front seat. And please don’t touch it while we’re standing there talking to you.”

4) I must have a concealed handgun permit to carry a gun in my car.
“The concealed permit says you only have to have a permit if you’re going to conceal it. There’s no permit required for open carry. … It’s when you’re going to hide it on your person that a permit is required.”

5) I need a permit to keep a handgun in my home.
“That’s the great thing about the way Louisiana law is written. Your home is your castle. It’s your castle. You can do whatever you want inside your home with a gun as long as you don’t violate other laws. There’s no permit required to keep a gun inside your home.”

6) A handgun is always the best first option for dealing with trouble in and around my home.
The death of a teenage robber last week in Shreveport was “sadly tragic, but justifiable,” Crichton said. The woman who shot and killed the teenager had her life threatened, even though his end goal was stealing her property.
Crichton presented several hypothetical cases for which a firearm isn’t the best way to tackle a problem around the home. Defense of life — your own or another — is justification for measures up to and including lethal force, Crichton said. Defense of property is not.


Caddo judge to address North Shreveport Lions

Caddo District Court Judge Scott Crichton, who has announced a bid for a spot on the state Supreme Court, will speak Thursday, September 24 at the weekly meeting of the North Shreveport Lions Club

Crichton’s talk will be at noon at the D&W Business Center, 1434 Hawn Ave.

Crichton, a 1980 LSU Law School graduate, was sworn in as a Caddo district judge January 1, 1991 and since then has been re-elected to successive terms.

Lunch will be $9 but it is free to listen.

For more information, call (318) 929-2341


Judge Scott Crichton Hosts Big Fundraiser at 2Johns Steak & Seafood, Bossier City – By: Maggie Martin, The Times

Throw a $500-a-person political fundraiser at 2 Johns Steak & Seafood, Bossier City, and they will come. And some 300 VIPPs — Very Important Power Persons — did in late August for Caddo Dist. Judge Scott Crichton, who is running unopposed for Louisiana Supreme Court justice from 11-parish District 2. It was hosted by “Committee to Elect Judge Scott Crichton.”

“Everybody who is anybody is here,” said columnist Lou Burnett, a respected political observer as he studied the crowd.

You can bet they were schmoozing and working the high-powered crowd.

Among the A-listers eating, drinking — wine, cokes or water — and being merry: state Rep. Henry Burns, Shreveport City Councilmen Oliver Jenkins and Jeff Everson, Community Activist Lloyd Thompson, Alexis Scott, Merritt and Virginia Chastain, Lee Davis, Lee Roy Clemons Jr., Bossier-Webster District Judge Parker Self, Susie Stinson who is court administrator for the 26th Judicial Court, Markey Washington, and Bossier Assistant District Attorney Santi Parks.

More: Caddo Dist. Judges John Mosely and Ramon Lafitte, Bossier Assessor Bobby Edmiston, 2 John’s proprietor John Montelepre, Roy Fletcher, Eric Johnson, David Wyndon, Bossier City Court Judge Tommy Wilson, Craig Marcotte, Shreveport City Court Judges Sheva Sims and Bill Kelley, Don Otis and Crichton campaign managers, Crichton’s wife, Susie Crichton, Debbie Martin and Carolyn Prator.

Although he is unopposed, Crichton is campaigning as though he is, and in his talk he touched on protection of the 2nd Amendment, the importance of prayer in the country’s creed and his crime prevention teen education program.


On the road to a robe

The road to becoming a Louisiana Supreme Court Justice has gotten pretty smooth for Caddo District Court Judge Scott Crichton over the past several weeks. First off, the big break came when the two-term incumbent, Justice Jeff Victory of Shreveport, decided not to seek a third term. That development spurred rumors of two potential opponents for Crichton, who had become the lone candidate for the coveted seat on the state’s high court. But Judge Jay Caraway of the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeal and Sabine Parish District Judge Stephen Beasley both decided not run. It is not surprising, therefore, that Crichton now needs a larger bandwagon. That was evident this past week at a fundraiser held at 2Johns Restaurant in Bossier City. Among the overflow crowd were area judges, sheriffs, district attorneys, judges, assessors, state legislators – you name it. It was the place to be seen. Nevertheless, Crichton is taking all the growing support for his candidacy without being over-confident. He says he will continue to run as though he has an opponent and will campaign in all 11 parishes in the judicial district. It is still early – the election is not until the fall of 2014 – and it is quite possible that an opponent could surface somewhere along that road. But with 58% of the registered voters residing in Caddo and Bossier parishes, it seems he has solid support in those two parishes. Judge Beasley, in announcing he would not run, said it will be hard for someone from one of the rural parishes to be competitive.


Judicial Surprise – Significant development ignored by media

By Lou Gehrig Burnett

Senior Political Columnist

There has been a significant development in judicial circles in our part of the state which has been virtually ignored by the local mainstream media. Why? I don’t know. But here is what has happened.

Louisiana Supreme Court Justice Jeff Victory, who was facing re-election for a third 10-year term on the state’s high court in 2014, was going to run — so everyone thought. But months ago, Caddo District Judge Scott Crichton of Shreveport announced he was going to seek the Supreme Court seat and oppose Victory. To do so, he was giving up a safe district court seat because all district court judges face re-election at the same time the Supreme Court race is on the ballot.

Crichton, who has been on the district court bench for 23 years, made his decision because of a provision in the Louisiana Constitution that says no one can run for judge if he or she is 70 years or older. Crichton could not wait for another 10 years to pass because by the time the Supreme Court election rolled around in 2020, he would be unable to run because he would be past 70 years of age.

After Crichton declared his candidacy, Victory announced that he would run for a third term. But on July 30, I broke the story in my Fax-Net Update, which made statewide news, that Victory had decided to retire. Victory has not made a public statement to that effect, but I based my exclusive on reliable sources with whom Victory or his wife had spoken.

The news of Victory’s retirement caught many politicos by surprise. He has served on the Supreme Court for what will be 20 years and has a total of 33 years of judicial service, having served on the Caddo District Court and the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeal before being elected to the state’s high court. To be sure, if anyone ever earned a retirement, Victory has, and our area will certainly give him plaudits for his exemplary service.

Victory’s retirement left Crichton without an opponent for the judicial plum. After all, the Louisiana Supreme Court is to the state what the U.S. Supreme Court is to the nation. Most judges dream of one day serving on the state Supreme Court. So the rumor mill went into high gear, saying that Judge Jay Caraway of Bossier City, who is on the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeal, was considering the state Supreme Court race. Caraway is serving his second 10-year term on the Court of Appeal.

But, once again, my Fax-Net was able to publish an exclusive. After talking with Caraway, he revealed to me that he had decided not to run. “I enjoy my present job on the Court of Appeal, and I plan to stay there. I wish Scott the best of luck,” he said. Other sources reported that no one on the Caddo District Court or the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeal was interested in opposing Crichton.

So, one again, Crichton remained the lone candidate for the District 2 seat on the seven-member Louisiana Supreme Court. The 2nd District is comprised of the following parishes: Caddo, Bossier, Webster, DeSoto, Red River, Sabine, Natchitoches, Vernon, Beauregard, Allen, and Evangeline. Any sitting judge, district attorney or assistant district attorney can be a candidate for the Supreme Court, as can any attorney who has practiced law for at least 10 years.

Politicos believe that it would be extremely rare for someone to go unopposed for an open seat on the state Supreme Court, so the rumor mill shifted gears and was saying that District Judge Stephen Beasley of Sabine Parish was going to run. Beasley had run against Victory in 2004 and received 39 percent of the vote. So that was my cue to call Judge Beasley to see if he was interested in the race.

Beasley told me he is not going to run for the Supreme Court and would seek re-election to the Sabine Parish District Court. He noted that he is the lone judge in the parish, and he likes that responsibility. He also ws well aware that 58 percent of the registered voters in the judicial district reside in Caddo and Bossier parishes. And that reality presented a huge challenge to anyone from outside of those two parishes to mount a viable campaign against Crichton.

After I revealed that information, the rumor mill has been quiet, and no other potential candidates are being mentioned. To his credit, the popular Crichton has exhibited a brilliant campaign strategy, which has put him in great shape to win the coveted Supreme Court seat. He announced early and has been holding fundraisers, attended by overflow crowds, as well as lining up support from judges, attorneys, and elected officials.

But don’t expect Crichton to let up. He remains in full campaign mode and is traveling the district to shore up support in the rural parishes. In other words, he continues to run as though he has an opponent. There is nothing more uncertain than political elections, and there is still a long way to go in this one. Qualifying is not until August 20-22, 2014. The election is scheduled for November 4, 2014.


Stop the Presses! – Another Supreme No-Go

By Lou Gehrig Burnett

Another Supreme no-go
There is a Louisiana Supreme Court robe hanging on the rack, but finding anyone who wants to challenge Caddo District Court Judge Scott Crichton for it is proving to be an elusive proposition.
FAX-NET EXCLUSIVE!
The latest potential candidate, District Court Judge Stephen Beasley of Sabine Parish tells the Fax-Net that he is not going to run. He challenged then-incumbent Justice Jeff Victory for the seat in 2004 and received 39% of the vote.
Beasley, who is familiar with District 2 of the state’s high court where the race is being held said, “I certainly understand the demographics and know that the majority of the vote is in Caddo and Bossier parishes. It would be hard for someone from a rural parish to be competitive.”
His decision not to run follows in the footsteps of Judge Jay Caraway of the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeal. The Fax-Net revealed last week that Caraway will not seek the seat.
Currently, no other names are being mentioned as potential candidates, leaving Crichton the lone declared candidate so far. The election is scheduled for the fall of 2014.
Beasley, who ran as a Democrat in 2004 against Victory, said that he is now an independent, which, in Louisiana, means he is “No Party.” He said he will run for re-election to his district court seat.
“I am the only district court judge in all of Sabine Parish, and I am happy with being that,” Beasley noted. If he chose to run for the Louisiana Supreme Court, he would have to give up his district court position.
That’s a dilemma for district court judges who might have an interest in the state’s high court because all of them are up for re-election at the same time as the Supreme Court race.
The stars seem to have aligned for Crichton, who has been a district court judge for 23 years. He announced early he would seek the coveted seat and oppose Victory, who is concluding his second 10-year term on the Supreme Court.
That move was cause for pause for most judges who may have been casting an eye at the seat if Victory had announced he would not run for re-election to a third term.
At the time of Crichton’s declaration, Victory said he would seek re-election, but subsequently decided to retire, leaving Crichton with a huge head-start over anyone else who was thinking about running.
Crichton has secured the support of most who are major players in judicial elections, and he has been raising money throughout the district.
One can expect the Crichton bandwagon to get even more crowded now that the two judges most mentioned as possible opponents have both opted out of the race.
Crichton is not taking anything for granted, however. He says he will continue to campaign as if he has an opponent, realizing how uncertain politics can be in Louisiana.
Crichton Fundraiser
Judge Crichton has a fundraiser scheduled for Monday, August 26 from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. at 2Johns Restaurant, 2151 Airline Drive, Bossier City.
Tickets are $500 per person or per couple.

For more information, call Crichton’s campaign headquarters at 318-841-8000.


Stop the Presses! – Caraway: ‘No Way’

By Lou Gehrig Burnett

Caraway: ‘No way’
Judge Jay Caraway of the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeal will not run for the Louisiana Supreme Court seat being vacated by Justice Jeff Victory.
The political rumor mill had been prominently mentioning Caraway’s name as a potential candidate once Victory decided not to seek re-election, leaving Caddo District Court Judge Scott Crichton as the only candidate in the race.
FAX-NET EXCLUSIVE!
Caraway told the Fax-Net: “I am not going to do it.  I enjoy my present job on the Court of Appeal, and I plan to stay there.  I wish Scott the best of luck.”  Caraway is serving his second 10-year term.
The Fax-Net broke the story in its July 30 issue  that Victory, who has been the justice from the 2nd District on the seven-member Louisiana Supreme Court for 20 years, would not seek a third term.
While Victory has not publicly announced his retirement, reliable sources close to Victory confirmed that he is hanging up his robe after 33 years of judicial service, having also served on the Caddo District Court and the 2nd Circuit Court of Appeal.
One other name is being mentioned as a possible candidate – District Court Judge Stephen Beasley of Sabine Parish.  He ran against Victory in 2004 and received 39% of the vote.
But the decision for Beasley will not be an easy one.  He will have to give up his district court seat because all district court judges are up for re-election at the same time as the Louisiana Supreme Court race.
And, he had a tough race when he ran for re-election in 2008, winning another term on the district court by only 80 votes.
Crichton has served on the Caddo District Court  for 23 years.  He, too, is giving up his district court seat to run for the state’s high court.
He has said he did so because no one can run for a judicial seat if he or she is 70 years of age or older. Crichton will be just past 60 when he runs in 2014.  He would not be able to run for the high court, therefore, if he waited another 10 years.
All sitting judges are eligible to run for the Louisiana Supreme Court, but they must reside in the judicial district.  So can district attorneys and assistant district attorneys, and just plain attorneys, if they have practiced law for at least 10 years.
Crichton’s early entry into the race, and the subsequent retirement of Victory, leaves any potential candidate with a lot of ground to make up relative to name recognition and money.
Crichton is receiving strong support from attorneys and political movers and shakers from throughout the judicial district as his campaign moves into high gear.  His fundraisers have been attended by overflow crowds and more are scheduled.
Among registered  voters  in  the  2nd  District,  58%  reside  in  Caddo and Bossier parishes.  It is unlikely any candidate from outside of those two parishes could be competitive against the popular Crichton – and no one  in those two parishes now seem inclined to run.
But there is still a long way to go.  Qualifying for this judicial seat is not until August 20-22, 2014.


Retiring the Robe

By Lou Gehrig Burnett

After wearing the judicial robe for 33 years, Louisiana Supreme Court Justice Jeff Victory, 67, of Shreveport is retiring at the end of his current term on December 31, 2014.

Reliable sources tell the Fax-Net that he will not seek a third 10-year term on the state’s high court. No official public announcement has been made, however, but it is confirmed that Victory will retire.

FAX-NET EXCLUSIVE!

The news of Victory’s retirement had the political rumor mill abuzz this past weekend. Much discussion had taken place on whether Victory would retire or face what would have been a tough race for re-election.

Caddo District Court Judge Scott Crichton, who has served on the bench for 23 years, had already thrown his robe into the ring and has been actively campaigning and raising money for a race against the incumbent justice.

When contacted by the Fax-Net, Crichton said, “I commend Justice Victory on three decades of judicial service, and I wish him and his family the very best.” For now, Crichton, a Republican, is the lone candidate in the race for the 2nd District seat on the seven-member Louisiana Supreme Court. The election is scheduled for the fall of 2014.

The 2nd District consists of 11 parishes – Caddo, Bossier, Webster, DeSoto, Red River, Sabine, Natchitoches, Vernon, Beauregard, Allen, and Evangeline.

There are 409,524 registered voters in the 2nd District. Of that total, 258,949 or 63% are white, 133,791 or 33% are black, and 16,784 or 4% are other races. By party affiliation, 192,244 or 47% are Democrats, 119,704 or 29% are Republicans, and 97,576 or 24% are Other Parties.

Interestingly, of the total number of registered voters in the district, 237,436 or 58% reside in Caddo and Bossier parishes. A seat on the Louisiana Supreme Court is certainly a judicial plum, and it is unlikely that Crichton will be unopposed.

In fact, the political rumor mill is already saying that 2nd Circuit Court of Appeal Judge Jay Caraway, 50, a Democrat from Bossier City, is giving some thought to entering the race. He did not return a phone call from the Fax-Net over the weekend.

If anyone has ever earned his retirement, Victory has. Here is a brief look at his judicial career:

*1995-2014: Justice, Louisiana Supreme Court.
*1990-1995: Judge, Louisiana Second Circuit Court of Appeal.
*1981-1990: Judge, 1st Judicial District, Louisiana.
*1971-1981: Attorney, Tucker, Jeter and Jackson.

 


Natchitoches Times – July 16, 2013

Judge Scott J. Crichton, a 23-year veteran on the First Judicial District Court, presented the Natchitoches Rotary Club with a very timely program on the 2nd Amendment which focused on gun rights, permits, and self protection law. He was joined in the presentation by Lt. Steven Joe, the Training Academy officer for the Caddo Parish Sheriff’s Office who addressed the common misconceptions on gun rights, the process for concealed carry permits, and carry restrictions. Judge Crichton and Lt. Joe also covered Louisiana law and recent state cases related to self defense and advised everyone that the first action in case of threat of bodily harm should be to contact local law enforcement where possible. Information on concealed carry permits is available from your local sheriff’s office or the Louisiana State Police. Pictured from left to right are the Rotarian with the program, John Luster; Judge Crichton, and Lt. Joe. Rotary-07-16-2013


Judge Scott Crichton Campaign Update

The 2014 Louisiana Supreme Court election is coming into view and the campaign to elect Judge Scott Crichton is well underway. A crowd of over 500 attended his campaign announcement party on April 29th at Ernest’s Orleans restaurant in Shreveport, LA. The event included many fellow judges and law enforcement officials from around the state. Judge Crichton remained very busy in the months of May and June speaking to various community organizations on topics ranging from gun control to the public impact of drunk driving while he continued attending fundraising events throughout the state.

The Louisiana Supreme Court is composed of seven justices elected from districts throughout Louisiana, with one justice elected from each of the districts. Judge Scott Crichton is running for Second District. Each justice of the Louisiana Supreme Court serves a 10 year term of office. The Lousiana Supreme Court election will be held on Dec 16, 2014.


Prator Joins Crichton Campaign

By Lou Gehrig Burnett.

Local politicos consider it big plus for the campaign of District Court Judge Scott Crichton, who is running for a seat on the Louisiana Supreme Court. He has announced that Carolyn Prator, wife of Caddo Parish Sheriff Steve Prator, will be co-manager of his judicial campaign along with Crichton’s wife, Susie. Crichton is challenging incumbent Associate Justice Jeff Victory, who has held the District 2 seat on the seven-member Louisiana Supreme Court since 1995. Both are Republicans.

For Crichton, who has been a District Court judge for more than 20 years, it’s an all-or-nothing scenario. That’s because it’s a rarity when the election for District Court judge and Louisiana Supreme Court judge occur at the same time. In 2014, that’s the case. So Crichton has to give up his District Court seat to run for Justice on the state’s highest court. His decision was prompted by state law, which says one cannot run for judge if he or she is 70 years of age or older. Crichton will be just past 60 when the election rolls around in 2014. Since the term on the Louisiana Supreme Court is for 10 years, he would not be able to run in 2024.

Basically, it’s now or never for him to seek a seek on the Louisiana Supreme Court. Justice Victory has worn the judicial robe for 32 years. In 1981, he was elected to the First Judicial District Court, and in 1990 was elected to the Second Circuit Court of Appeal for a term beginning January 1, 1991. He served there until he was elected as an Associate Justice of the Louisiana Supreme Court for a term beginning on January 1, 1995. Victory will be 68 at the time of the 2014 election, so he is eligible for one more 10-year term.

Louisiana Supreme Court District 2 consists of 11 parishes – Caddo, Bossier, Webster, DeSoto, Red River, Sabine, Natchitoches, Vernon, Beauregard, Allen, and Evangeline.
Crichton’s campaign headquarters is located at 725 Southfield Road. The phone number is 318-841-8000.

Qualifying for the election is August 20-22, 2014. The primary election is November 4, and the runoff, if needed, is December 6.


Crichton’s Supreme Court Campaign Kickoff a Major Success

One way to send a message (like in all capitals) to a future political opponent is to open a campaign with a well-publicized and very well-attended fund-raiser. And that’s exactly what Caddo District Judge Scott Crichton did at his campaign kickoff recently. If Supreme Court Justice Jeff Victory really thought that Crichton would be just a talking head, then Victory may want to reassess his upcoming opponent.

It’s a rare occasion when a local political campaign cranks up some 17 plus months before the action election – and a year before the qualifying period. But with Judge Crichton, it’s a win or “go to the house” election next fall. His term on the Caddo bench ends in 2014 – and he cannot run to retain his seat and for the Louisiana Supreme Court at the same time. Crichton as opted to pursue the state’s top court.

Crichton’s event drew more political heavyweights than any local fund-raising soiree in many, many years. The 500-plus crowd included many fellow judges: Minden City Court Judge John Campbell; 26th Judicial District Judges Mike Nerren and Ford Stinson; Caddo Judges Roy Brun, Eugene Bryson (retired), Kathryn Dorroh, Ramon Lafitte, Mike Pitman and Frank Thaxton (retired); and Second Circuit Judges Jeanette Garrett and Frances Pitman. Law enforcement officials present included Bienville Sheriff John Balance, Bossier Sheriff Julian Whittingong, Caddo Sheriff Steve Prator and Shreveport City Marshall Charlie Caldwell.

Caddo District Attorney Charles Scott and Bossier First Assistant District Attorney Lane Pittard also attended along with former Caddo D.Ap. Paul Carmousche. Other elected officials at the event included Shreveport City Councilman Jeff Everson and Sam Jenkins, Caddo Parish Commission members Matthew Linn and Ken Epperson, Louisiana Public Service Commissioner Foster Campbell, and Caddo School Board member Dottie Bell, along with former Shreveport Mayor Keith Hightower.

Community and business leaders in the crowd included Dr. C.O. Simpson, Delton Harrison, Brady Blade, NAACP President Lloyd Thompson, Paul Broussard, Barry Busada, Bob Brown, Jeff Cole, Don Horton and James Madden. Barristers at the event included Bernard Johnson, Jim McMichael, Greg Barro, Ted Caston, Dannye Malone and Don Weir. The medical community was also well represented: Dr. Larry Allen, Dr. Tommy Palmer, Dr. Donald Posner, Dr. Mike Haynie and Doctors Carol and David Clemens, among others.

Speakers giving endorsements to Crichton were Debbie Martin, Jim McMichael and Don Horton, Jim McMichael and Don Horton. Crichton’s well-scripted event included the announcement of a campaign headquarters (752 Southfield Road) along with opening and closing prayers by Pastor Alston and Bishop Brandon.

Victory has announced that he will seek re-election, although many doubt that he will actually qualify in June of next year. He can retire with a very generous pension and keep his campaign funds that can be doled out to candidates and political causes of his choosing. Victory’s age (68 next year) and his health will undoubtedly be factors in his campaign decisions as well as Crichton’s determination, political strength and campaign financing.

Although some believe that Victory can raise more money that Crichton (reportedly from South Louisiana), few politicos think Victory will actually go head to head against Crichton. There’s little doubt that Crichton will have very strong black support, and his fund-raiser reflected the diversity of his supporters. Crichton will no doubt maintain a full court press during the next year, and his prospects of success are very high.

Scott Crichton Editoral


Crichton Announcement in the Shreveport Times

by Adam Duvernay

Caddo District Judge Scott Crichton wants to be Justice Crichton.

After more than 20 years on the Caddo District Court bench, Crichton this week formally announced his intention to seek a position on the Louisiana Supreme Court. The voters’ choice on that promotion is more than a year away, but he’s starting early.

“I love the job I have. I hate to leave it, but I’m going to,” Crichton said. Win or lose, Crichton will end his career as a district judge after the Supreme Court election in fall 2014″. Because qualifying for the those, two posts falls on the same dates in August 2014, he said, he’ll either be a justice or out of a job.

Crichton will compete with Shreveport native and sitting Justice Jeffery Victory, who was elected as an associate justice of the Supreme Court for a term that began Jan. 1,1995. Victory could not be reached for comment by press time. Crichton will be 60 years old at election time in 2014, meaning if he is elected over Victory, it will be for only one 10-year term. The Louisiana Constitution forbids people older than 70 from qualifying for the position.

“One shot, that’s it,” as Crichton said.

“If I’m not elected, I will go back to work.” Just not as a judge, he added.

Crichton graduated from LSU Law School in 1980. He took a job as a Caddo District Court law clerk in August 1980 and, one year later, was sworn in as an assistant district attorney under then-Caddo District Attorney Paul Carmouche.

Crichton was sworn in as a Caddo district judge Jan. 1, 1991. He’s since been re-elected to 3 six-year terms.

“If he gets elected, you’re going to lose one of the hardest-working judges in Caddo Parish, no doubt,” said Ron Miciotto,
a Shreveport attorney who often has stood before Crichton during thge judge’s tenure on the bench. “He’s ready for the Supreme Court.”

Miciotto described Crichton as a straight and fair judge who never has shied from working after hours. The man. has
evolved over 20 years, something Miciotto said should happen for everyone, but has remained true to a by-the-book style
of judging.

“When you go before Judge Crichton, you always know you have to be prepared because he’s read the whole me,” Miciotto said. “He’ll know as much as you do.” The easiest way for an attorney to get under Crichton’s skin, Miciotto said, is to show up for trial unprepared. The judge demands professionalism from everyone in his courtroom, Miciotto said, and delivers the same level of respect.

Crichton is known for his conservative rulings and avoidance of judicial activism. Off the bench, he spends many hours each year in front of high school and grade school students with his “Don’t Let This Be You” program. Those sessions – which tackle subjects like sexting, drinking and driving and, soon, home and personal defense – keep him fueled and in
touch with the community, he said.

“I’m blessed to have a law degree. With this blessing comes duty” Crichton said. “It’s not
enough for a judge to merely sit on a bench and sentence people.”

 

shreveport-times-article

Shreveport Times Part 2


A Message From Scott Crichton

After considerable thought, family discussion and prayer, I am pleased to announce that I am a candidate for the Louisiana Supreme Court, District 2, which election will be held in the fall of 2014. The district covers 11 parishes.

A 1980 graduate of LSU Law School, I have now served as a lawyer, prosecutor and judge for more than three decades – 10 years as an assistant district attorney and civil practitioner and over 22 years as a district judge, where I have presided over more than 25,000 civil and criminal cases. I view the position of judge as a tremendous honor, and I have enjoyed my work immensely.

I have also worked hard to improve the judiciary and serve on the following committees:

  • Advisory Committee to the Supreme Court on Judicial Canons;
  • Louisiana Judicial College Board of Governors;
  • Court Rules Committee (Rules for Louisiana District Courts);
  • Criminal Best Practices Committee; and
  • Continuing Legal Education Committee of the Shreveport Bar Association (Co-Chair) and Louisiana State Bar Association.

I am Immediate Past President of the Louisiana District Judges Association (2011-2012) and have served on the Louisiana Supreme Court Committee on Judicial Ethics (2011-2012).

In addition to my judicial work, I have designed the following programs:

  • “Don’t Let This Be You”, a crime prevention/teen education program which I have personally presented to more than 20,000 high school students, teachers and parents;
  • “Sexting, Texting and Beyond” a program on the moral and legal consequences of electronic misbehavior, including cyberbullying and sexting, which I have presented to thousands of middle and high school students;
  • “No More Strikes”, a program for inmates in The Department of Corrections Reentry Program, the purpose of which is to educate inmates on the laws that impact their status as convicted felons, to change attitudes and, hopefully, reduce recidivism!
  • “Bullet Points on the Second Amendment: Guns, Permits and Self Protection” which provides adults information and insight on self defense and home protection.

After speaking to a number of people in our community, I am very encouraged by the enthusiastic response my candidacy has received. I believe that my integrity, work ethic and community involvement merits promotion to the Supreme Court.

You may contact me by e-mail at scott@scottforjustice.com, by phone at (318) 841-8000, or by mail at P.O. Box 3844, Shreveport, LA 71133. You are invited to visit me after work hours and on weekends at my campaign office located at 725 Southfield Road (behind Rhino Coffee). Of course, all of the above are paid for by campaign committee funds in accordance with law.

I ask for your support, your precious time and advice for the challenge that lies ahead, and I look forward to serving our communities and the State of Louisiana as your Supreme Court Justice.
Sincerely,
Scott J. Crichton


Judge Scott Crichton Announces Candidacy

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

JUDGE SCOTT CRICHTON ANNOUNCES CANDIDACY FOR LA. SUPREME COURT

Promises “hard work, conservative approach,, and commitment to communities”

–Former prosecutor and current District Judge Scott Crichton, Republican-Shreveport, has announced his candidacy for the Louisiana Supreme Court 2 District.

Crichton, a trial court judge for the last 23 years, promised in his announcement “to do as I have always done…work hard, bring the conservative approach of following the law not making the law, and continue my longtime commitment to our children and communities”.

Besides presiding over hundreds of jury trials and thousands of hearings and bench trials, totaling more than 25,QOO civil and criminal cases, during his career on the First Judicial District Court bench. Crichton, 58, has been actively involved in educating teens about crime and the consequences of crime.

“Six years ago, I realized that many of our young people simply do not understand the consequences of criminal behavior,” Crichton said, “and, if known, it would help prevent criminal acts by our youth.”

Crichton created two programs which he has presented to more than 20,000 teens, parents and teachers in high schools, churches and community groups. “Don”l Let This Be You” is a teen consequences presentation and “Sexting, Texting, and Beyond” is a presentation on electronic laws and related misbehavior.

“If we are to protect our children and insure the strength of our families and communities, it is essential that a judge also be a teacher, not just a judge,” Crichton commented.

“A judge must be active and engaged in our communities,” Crichton continued, “and do all he can to protect families, strengthen communities, and keep people safe.”

Before being elected judge, Crichton served 10 years as Assistant District Attorney in Caddo Parish where he prosecuted numerous violent criminals including death penalty cases.

Crichton was the lead prosecutor in the successful conviction and death penalty sentence of the worst serial killer in Caddo Parish history, the Nathaniel Code case. “As a prosecutor and a judge. I have been fighting crime in our state and my record is clear, conservative, law and order,” Crichton said.

Crichton is currently involved in instructing citizens on their gun rights granted by the 2nd Amendment of the U.S. Constitution and the Constitution and laws of Louisiana through his program “Bullet Points on the 2nd Amendment: Guns. Permits and Self-Protection”.

Crichton. a member of the NRA, strongly supports individuals’ gun rights.

Judge Scott Crichton is a former Adjunct Instructor of Business Law at LSU-Shreveport.

Among his numerous judicial activities, Judge Crichton is the Immediate Past President of the Louisiana District Judges Association, has served on the Supreme Court Committee on Judicial Ethics and senses on the Advisory Committee to the Louisiana Supreme Court on Judicial Canons, the Board of Governors of the Louisiana Judicial College and the Criminal Best Practices Committee.

He was also a graduate of the inaugural class of the Louisiana Judicial Leadership Institute and is certified by the National Judicial College in program design.

Judge Crichton is Co-Chairman of the CLE Committee (continuing legal education) of the Shreveport Bar Association as well as a former member of the CLE Committee of the Louisiana State Bar Association.

He has presented over 100 CLE programs to various legal groups throughout the state.

Judge Crichton received his B.S. degree in 1976 from LSU and his Juris Doctor degree in 1980 from the LSU Law School.

He and his wife, Susie, have been married for 27 years and have two sons. They are members of the St. Mark’s Episcopal Church in Shreveport where Judge Crichton serves on the Vestry.

The 2nd District of the Louisiana Supreme Court encompasses 11 parishes including Caddo, Bossier, Webster, Desoto, Sabine, Vernon, Beauregard, Allen, Evangeline, Red River and Natchitoches.

The election will be held in the fall of 2014.

“While the 2nd District is a large and diverse area, 1 want to meet as many citizens as possible.” Crichton said. “I strongly believe a judge needs to be in touch with the thoughts, values and beliefs of the people,” Crichton continued.

“I take this opportunity to personally and humbly ask for the support and vote of each citizen in the 2nd District and I look forward to serving our communities and our State on the highest court of Louisiana,” Crichton concluded.

For more information about Judge Scott Crichton and/or to get involved in his campaign, contact him at scott@scottforiustice.com.